The best way to ensure your event or activity is inclusive of all people is to think about things beforehand! Have a plan about how you will organise everything to be as accessible as possible. If you keep access and inclusion on the agenda, you will set yourself up to run a successful, inclusive event.

It is good to think about specific accommodations a person with disability might need. If you can, ask the participants about their unique access needs beforehand. You can do this by inviting people to get in touch with you or through the registration form.

You can’t do everything, but you can clearly inform people about access and barriers before they arrive.

–YDAS

Remember, it is impossible to be accessible for everyone. For example, people with ASD often find it easier to read information printed in black ink on a yellow background. People with low vision often find it easiest to read yellow text on a black background!

You can’t do everything, but you can clearly inform people about access and barriers before they arrive. Definitely don’t be afraid to say that something is inaccessible. It’s much better to specify that there is a barrier that can’t be removed than surprise the person when they try to access your venue and cannot. Young people with disability will appreciate your honesty.

See how some organisations are publicising this important information in the form of an access key.

Read more:

Check out the following checklist developed by Australian Network on Disability on things to consider when planning events. Remember, you don’t necessarily have to do all these things, but let people know what barriers you can’t remove.

https://www.and.org.au/pages/event-checklist.html

Meetings & Events Australia have developed an in-depth report on planning accessible events

http://www.meetingsevents.com.au/downloads/Accessible_Events_Guide.pdf

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